Bill Gives Feds Unprecedented Access To Personal, Online Info

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This is a frightening piece of legislation, seemingly removing any and all online privacy (if there was any shred left to begin with).

How would you like to have your emails reviewed before you can be hired by the federal government? What if they checked your Google Drive for proprietary information and stole it from you?

This bill must be stopped. Contact your Senators and tell them why they should vote against Leahy’s bill, scheduled for a vote next week.

From CNet.com:

Proposed law scheduled for a vote next week originally increased Americans’ e-mail privacy. Then law enforcement complained. Now it increases government access to e-mail and other digital files.

A Senate proposal touted as protecting Americans’ e-mail privacy has been quietly rewritten, giving government agencies more surveillance power than they possess under current law, CNET has learned.

Patrick Leahy, the influential Democratic chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, has dramatically reshaped his legislation in response to law enforcement concerns, according to three individuals who have been negotiating with Leahy’s staff over the changes. A vote on his bill, which now authorizes warrantless access to Americans’ e-mail, is scheduled for next week.

Revised bill highlights:
✭ Grants warrantless access to Americans’ electronic correspondence to over 22 federal agencies. Only a subpoena is required, not a search warrant signed by a judge based on probable cause.
✭ Permits state and local law enforcement to warrantlessly access Americans’ correspondence stored on systems not offered “to the public,” including university networks.
✭ Authorizes any law enforcement agency to access accounts without a warrant — or subsequent court review — if they claim “emergency” situations exist.
✭ Says providers “shall notify” law enforcement in advance of any plans to tell their customers that they’ve been the target of a warrant, order, or subpoena.
✭ Delays notification of customers whose accounts have been accessed from 3 days to “10 business days.” This notification can be postponed by up to 360 days.

Leahy’s rewritten bill would allow more than 22 agencies — including the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Communications Commission — to access Americans’ e-mail, Google Docs files, Facebook wall posts, and Twitter direct messages without a search warrant. It also would give the FBI and Homeland Security more authority, in some circumstances, to gain full access to Internet accounts without notifying either the owner or a judge.

CNET obtained a draft of the proposed amendments from one of the people involved in the negotiations with Leahy; it’s embedded at the end of this post. The document describes the changes as “Amendments intended to be proposed by Mr. Leahy.”

It’s an abrupt departure from Leahy’s earlier approach, which required police to obtain a search warrant backed by probable cause before they could read the contents of e-mail or other communications. The Vermont Democrat boasted last year that his bill “provides enhanced privacy protections for American consumers by… requiring that the government obtain a search warrant.”

Read the full story at CNet.com.

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Comments

  1. CALL YOUR SENATORS. Unlimited access to your online documents by 22 agencies? The Senate Judiciary Committee will decide whether to recommend that to the US Senate for a vote next Thursday, November 29. People who oppose this approach to privacy in the digital age should contact members of the committee (link below) before then. They should also contact their own two Senators if the committee approves the bill in its current form. Pay attention next week to find out. http://www.judiciary.senate.gov/about/members.cfm

  2. Reblogged this on therasberrypalace.

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